1

Think about what you are looking for in your dance studio. Are you training to be a professional dancer?  Are you dancing for fun? It is important that if you are serious about dance that you don’t get stuck in recreation oriented classes. At the same time, joining a difficult class if that isn’t what you want can lessen your enjoyment.

2

Check out the qualifications of the teachers. Many excellent dancers do not make good teachers. Your teacher does not need to be a great dancer, but needs to be knowledgeable enough to be able to instruct people with different body-types, abilities, and learning styles. A teacher with an impressive dance resume may not know how to describe movement for beginners.

3

Talk to local dancers you know. See what they have to say about the dance studios. Dancers have usually attended more than one dance studio in their lives, if they’ve been dancing for a number of years, and they will probably have a suggestion.

4

Make a decision on how far you are willing to commute. Do you want to be able to walk there? Is driving for 30 minutes going to be okay? Is there a convenient train or bus?

5

Ask if you can sit and watch for a while. Some studios offer ‘open classes’ designed to give future students a feel for the rigor of the instruction.You won’t really be able to judge whether you like or dislike the studio until you have taken a few classes with a few different teachers. Teachers should give positive reinforcements to students and be able to point out muscle alignments to improve technique.

6

Call (or email) the studio. Depending on your goals (fun, improvement…) you may not be willing to alter your schedule a lot to include classes. Be sure you explain to the owner of the studio when you could take class, as well as your skill level and the level of intensity you are considering. He or she will probably have a schedule, but the names of the classes can be confusing. Sometimes intermediate classes are classified as advanced, just to separate them from an even more intermediate class. Also, Intensive options are often offered, which can be confusing as well.

7

Narrow down your list by class times and varieties, and go to the studios still on your list to watch a class.

8

Find out the class size. If you want individual attention, talk to the director about private lesson availability

9

Consider how affordable the studio is. Do your research and figure out what would be a reasonable price to pay.

10

Choose your favorite!